Posts Tagged Poultry

Turkey Meatballs; Roast Fennel; Cauliflower Puree; Orzo

I think the title of this one may be too much for Twitter.  We shall see!  It looks like a lot, but the only part that was any real work was the meatballs (the cauliflower I had in the fridge already).  dscn3814 Read the rest of this entry »

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Turkey Picatta Florentine

I didn’t expect much of this one going in, but it turned out to be really tasty! I think next time I’ll make the “batter” in the food processor. It won’t be quite as pretty without the flecks of spinach in the crust, but it will adhere better to the cutlets.

This can be made with chicken or turkey (or veal or pork or seitan, really). I didn’t feel like pounding my own cutlets, so I went for the precut turkey. This recipe makes enough batter to coat about 1 lb of meat, but you can easily halve it to make less. (To reduce it further, you could always use an egg substitute, but a half recipe will feed 2 people if you have a side starch and a salad to go with it.) Read the rest of this entry »

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Spanish Chicken With Sweet Peppers

This recipe comes from Cooking Pleasures magazine, and was almost there.  It needed either a hint more richness (I certainly could have reduced the sauce more) or some spice (crushed red chiles, or maybe mustard?) or something.  Maybe a little lemon juice at the end to brighten it up?

Anyway, it was still pretty good, just missing something.  Good enough to make again and figure that out. Read the rest of this entry »

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Pulled Chicken Chili With Green Chiles

This recipe was published in the Washington Post several years ago and is one of my favorite chilis.  It’s mind-bogglingly easy, and also quick if you let the slow cooker do the broth overnight.

The toppings listed are very nice (especially olives!), but not essential.  I’ve frequently made this in the dead of winter and left off the fresh tomatoes rather than buy them out of season.  (The tomato in the broth doesn’t have to be at peak freshness – you’re going to cook the life out of it anyway.)

For the broth:

  • 1 5-lb chicken
  • 1 large tomato, quartered
  • 1 large yellow onion, quartered
  • 2 bay leaves
  • salt
  • 2 jalapeno peppers, sliced

Combine in a slow cooker with water to cover (don’t overfill!) and set on low for 8 hours, or overnight.  (Alternately, do this on the stovetop in a large pot for 1-3 hours.)  Strain the broth, reserving the chicken.  Discard the vegetables.

You will only need about 4 cups of broth for the chili, and will probably have about double that with this recipe.  If you freeze the extra you can make this again with a rotisserie chicken and it will be the fastest chili in the world. Read the rest of this entry »

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Pepper Chicken With Hummus

This is one of those recipes from Gourmet that you almost think must be a misprint, it’s so simple.  But it’s become a household staple of ours, the kind of thing we have when it’s the end of a long week and we want something comforting but not heavy, and something not requiring any specialized grocery shopping.  Here is a link to the original recipe – I don’t normally follow recipes to the letter, but this one is so simple that it really doesn’t require any improvisation.  (Okay, except for the kind and amount of peppers.  You can substitute almost any combination of sweet bell peppers in here.  My supermarket sells “rainbow packs” of red, orange, and yellow organic peppers so I usually use one of those along with a few Cubanelles.)

I have once or twice made my own hummus for this, but the Sabra Supremely Spicy is so good that I usually don’t bother.  (Until I discovered Sabra, I never bothered with store bought hummus at all, as every other brand I’ve tried has been bland and unpleasantly grainy.  If you’ve never made hummus I suggest starting with the recipe on the back of your jar of tahini paste and adapting from there to suit your taste.) Read the rest of this entry »

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In Which Jess Fails At Food Blogging

Seriously, I suck at this!

Last week at some point I made Pomegranate Glazed Chicken, and it was okay.  Not great, and so apparently not worth posting about.  (The pomegranate syrup that I made to substitute for the pomegranate molasses I couldn’t find has made its way into a few cocktails and glasses of seltzer, however.  Nom nom nom.)

After that I made what was supposedly Fettucine With Parsley And Parmesan, but wound up being kind of a repeat of the Fettucine With Broccoli and Pine Nuts because I had both on hand and wanted something more substantial than just a bowl of pasta.

Today I went to the farmer’s market and bought really good turkey burgers from the turkey guys.  (As well as a bag of “parts” – mostly necks – that is currently simmering its way to stock in my slow cooker.)  I also bought a few parsnips and made the parsnip “fries” from this recipe.  This is one of my favorite sides and I always forget about it because who ever thinks to buy parsnips?  Fortunately, the farmer’s markets in the Northeast are still all about the apples and storage veggies, so the parsnips were looking pretty good.  Parsnip parsnip parsnip.  The word has lost all meaning.

Next week I’ll be returning to The Book once or twice, but as I said a couple of weeks ago, I’ve kind of reached the point where the remaining recipes just don’t look all that appetizing.  (Or healthy, for that matter.  Half the side dishes in this book are variations on mashed potatoes.  Do I really need a recipe for that?)

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Turkey Picadillo Empanadas

This was more time-consuming than I expected (I didn’t mentally account for the extra 20 minutes needed to bake the empanadas – oops!) but the results were really good.  I really wish FreshDirect sold regular ground turkey instead of just the all-white-meat version – fat free ground meat is pretty much the definition of useless.  (When I buy my KitchenAid meat grinder attachment, I can buy boneless skinless thighs and grind my own.  In the meantime, I just use a little more veg oil in the initial saute.)

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Chicken Toscana / Creamed Spinach

I’ll start with the creamed spinach, since I made that one first.  This is a very standard recipe with the very welcome additions of leeks and arugula. I used fresh baby spinach, but frozen would work almost as well.

In a saucepan or skillet with high sides, heat 1 tbsp each of olive oil and butter.  Add 1 chopped cleaned leek and saute until softened.  (The recipe says not to let it brown, but I really wouldn’t worry about it too much.  A slightly caramelized leek is no bad thing.) Add 10 oz (1 bag) fresh chopped spinach and 2-4 cloves chopped or pressed garlic.  Saute until wilted.  Add 1 tbsp flour, stir to evenly combine.  Add (slowly) 1/2 cup milk or cream, stirring constantly.  Continue to cook over med-low heat until slightly thickened.  Add arugula and season with salt and pepper.

It’s probably worth mentioning that the original recipe called for a full cup of cream, but I stopped after 1/2 because it looked plenty creamy already, and I didn’t want to water it down.

The chicken was equally easy and also delicious.  The key is the herb marinade that it sits in overnight – once those flavors have worked their way in, there’s almost nothing left to do but heat and eat. Read the rest of this entry »

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Chili Cheese Tamales

This recipe earns the Whole Foods Market Cookbook its first EPIC FAIL.  The proportions given for masa dough in this recipe will give you a big bowl of corn flour soup.  I have decided the amount of masa harina (corn flour) must have a typo in it – the recipe calls for 1/2 cup, but 1 1/2 cups is the amount that actually makes sense.  I’m not going to post the recipe until I’ve made this successfully – I don’t really see the point.  (Basically, though, masa for tamales is masa harina, fat, and just enough water to make it come together.

The Tomatillo-Chipotle Salsa that goes into the tamales was pretty tasty.  I mean, it’s hard to go wrong with salsa verde, but the poblanos and chipotles gave this one a nice depth. Read the rest of this entry »

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Shepard's Pie

Another yummy success.  I made a few changes – the original recipe calls for tempeh but says “you can substitute beef” in the notes.  I split the difference and used ground turkey.  The recipe also specifies a cornstarch slurry as a thickener, and since I really dislike the texture cornstarch gives to gravies, I used flour instead, adding it after the first veggie saute like a roux.  And to the sweet potato topping, I added barley malt syrup (which I had on hand) instead of brown rice syrup (which I did not). Read the rest of this entry »

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